Summary of Readings

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    oremus.bible.org

    New Revised Standard Version

  • Scripture Summaries for December 2022 – Year A

     

     

     

    Scripture Summary for the 2nd Sunday of Advent – Year A (Dec 4) by Rev. Shelley

     

    Isaiah 11:1-10: Isaiah gives us reasons to rejoice. The house of David, now a mere dead stump, with no one on the throne, will once again flourish. This will happen because of the coming mysterious one - a mere shoot or branch from the royal tree. God's spirit will rest upon this “shoot” and he will bring glory to God and justice to the poor and meek. This new era will herald reconciliation between species and the knowledge of God will be our common language.

     

    Psalm 72: 1-7, 18-19: Here the psalmist is longing for what Isaiah says in on the way. The songwriter asks God to give to the king what he needs to rule with justice. He offers a litany of desires, beginning each one with “May he...”. These desires centre around a stable, healthy, peaceful and loving environment for all people. The psalmist ends his poem with words of blessing upon the Lord.

     

    Romans 15: 4-13: Here St. Paul quotes Isaiah's words; proclaiming them fulfilled in Jesus Christ. God has remained faithful to the Jewish nation; and has opened up the way of salvation to Gentiles as well. We can therefore live in hope and joy and peace. We can also hold the welcome door open to all others. Everyone is wanted in God's kingdom.

     

    Matthew 3:1-12: A prophet of the Lord has not spoken for 400 years. Suddenly John the Baptizer steps on the stage. No wonder the people flocked from the cities out into the wilderness to hear him. He comes with a message of repentance, and is especially hard on the religious leaders. He baptizes with water, but he points the way to one who will come baptizing with the power of the Holy Spirit.

     

     

     

    Scripture Summary for the 3rd Sunday of Advent – Year A (Dec 11) by Rev. Shelley

     

    Isaiah 35: 1-10: The prophet Isaiah paints a beautiful picture of what lies ahead in God's future. All of nature will live in harmony. The desert land will bloom with flowers. The thirsty land will teem with water. Wild beasts will be tame. The blind will see and the deaf will hear. No one will go astray, not even fools. So what can we do? Strengthen weak hands and encourage ones with fearful hearts. For the Lord will fill all with joy and gladness, and sorrow and sighing will be put to flight.

     

    Canticle 18 A (Luke 1:46-55): To replace our Psalm this morning we have a reading from the Gospel of Luke. Mary sings this song after she has been given the message that she will bear the Messiah. She cannot believe that this great event is happening to one who is poor and and of no repute. She sees now that God delights in doing what the world cannot imagine. The hungry are the ones being filled. The lowly are the ones being lifted up. It is the rich and powerful who are being sent away empty. This echoes what God has already done for tiny Israel; producing through them Father Abraham – the father of all those who have faith. Jesus will now open the way to God for the entire world.

     

    James 5:7-10: Again we are given encouragement to wait patiently and to endure. The picture of an attentive farmer shows us the way. The farmer must still plant, water, and mulch. There is work to be done; even if no plants are immediately visible. We too know the final outcome; God's kingdom of love will prevail. So we need to wait patiently; all the while preparing for God's harvest, as a farmer prepares for the coming crop. .

     

    Matthew 11:2-11: John the Baptist's message is just too hard for the ruling authorities to accept. So he is now in prison awaiting his fate. Here he begins to doubt. Is Jesus really the Messiah? Did I get it wrong? John's followers bring him back Jesus' reassuring response. “The words of Isaiah are about to be fulfilled in me”. Don't doubt. Jesus then gives John a beautiful affirming commendation that he is the greatest prophet that the world has seen. And in the final reversal – even the lowest in God's new kingdom will be greater than John, for they will know the full revelation of God revealed in Jesus Christ.

     

     

     

    Scripture Summary for 4th Sunday of Advent – Year A (Dec 18) by Rev. Shelley

     

    Isaiah 7:10-16: The prophet Isaiah comes to King Ahaz. “Ask the Lord for the most amazing sign that you can think of – anything”. But the king hesitates. So God provides a sign. A young woman will bear a child. This baby will bring hope, and his mother will name him Immanuel, meaning “God is with us”. This sign is not only for Ahaz's time, but is seen as a prophecy for the coming of Jesus Christ.

     

    Psalm 80:1-7, 17-19: The Psalmist calls on God to restore the fortunes of his people. He reminds God that He is their shepherd. He reminds God that the flock is in peril. “Restore us, O God; let your face shine, that we may be saved”. When this happens, the people will never forsake the Living God again.

     

    Romans 1:1-7: In this introduction to his most dense and theological letter, the Apostle Paul outlines his calling to ministry. He also summarizes the good news that he has been called to preach. The story has been outlined by the prophets. Jesus has come as a descendent of King David and has been declared the Son of God by his innocent death and glorious resurrection. This is good news for both Jews and Gentiles.

     

    Matthew 1:18-25: Today we hear Joseph's version of the Nativity story. It starts with disappointment – his fiancee is already pregnant. He wants to break the engagement quietly. However, God uses a powerful dream to give Joseph a different story line. This is not going to be an ordinary baby, and Mary has not been unfaithful to him. This is the long awaited “Emmanuel” - the one who will save his people from their sins. Joseph listened to his dream and obeyed by marrying Mary, and naming the baby “Jesus”.

     

     

     

    Scripture Summary for Christmas Eve – Year A by Rev. Shelley

     

    Isaiah 9:2-7: Isaiah poetically prophesies of a time when God will visit the people. Light instead of darkness. Rejoicing rather than repression. Army fatigues now used for kindling a fire. This will be brought about by a child. Wonderful Counselor. Mighty God. Everlasting Father. Prince of Peace. He will have special titles and will rule with righteousness and justice. (This passage was written approximately 600 years before the birth of Jesus).

     

    Psalm 96: The Psalmist invites us to sing to the Lord. All other gods are idols, but the Lord God made the cosmos. His judgement of all peoples will be fair and just. Therefore all the world can rejoice.

     

    Titus 2:11-14: St. Paul encourages us to live a worthy live as we wait for God to appear. We are to rely on his grace to show us how to live lives filled with righteousness and good deeds. How can we do this? By relying on God's grace, which brings salvation to all.

     

    Luke 2:1-20: Mary and Joseph. Angels and shepherds. The Roman emperor demanding obedience. We all know the story of Jesus' birth. The harder task is to see how the angel's message can become good news to us and how it can bring us great joy.

     

     

     

    Scripture Summary for Christmas - Year A by Rev. Shelley

     

    Isaiah 52:7-10: “Your God reigns”. What better way to start Christmas morning. If we have this song on our lips then we are called beautiful. This is a message of salvation to all. The city that has been ruined will be restored. God brings comfort to those in distress. God is the mighty one, bringing good news to all the earth.

     

    Psalm 98: The Psalmist invites us to sing to the Lord. Why? Because to this God belongs victory – over all those things that oppress: sin, unrighteousness, fear, and evil. And this is done in the sight of all the nations. Therefore we, and all creation can sing for joy and clap our hands.

     

    Hebrews 1:1-4, (5-12): Until that 1st Christmas day, God spoke through prophets (many of them recorded in our Bible). But now – all life will be looked at and lived through God’s Son Jesus Christ. This is the moment, and this is the One that the prophets have been pointing to and waiting for. Jesus will be the word “made flesh”. Through his sinless life of service and teaching, and his sacrificial death, Jesus will show us the heart of God.

     

    John 1:1-14: John does not follow Matthew and Luke in starting Jesus’ origin stories with infancy narratives. Instead he goes even further back in time to the creation of the cosmos. The Christ child, now so little and helpless, has chosen this new role. He was from “of old” but he wants to identify fully with all we go through in this vale of tears. The desire: to bring light to the world to enable us to see the glory of God in the flesh.

     

     

     

     

    Scripture Summary for the 2nd Sunday of Advent – Year A -(Dec 4) by Rev. Shelley

     

    Isaiah 11:1-10: Isaiah gives us reasons to rejoice. The house of David, now a mere dead stump, with no one on the throne, will once again flourish. This will happen because of the coming mysterious one - a mere shoot or branch from the royal tree. God's spirit will rest upon this “shoot” and he will bring glory to God and justice to the poor and meek. This new era will herald reconciliation between species and the knowledge of God will be our common language.

     

    Psalm 72: 1-7, 18-19: Here the psalmist is longing for what Isaiah says in on the way. The songwriter asks God to give to the king what he needs to rule with justice. He offers a litany of desires, beginning each one with “May he...”. These desires centre around a stable, healthy, peaceful and loving environment for all people. The psalmist ends his poem with words of blessing upon the Lord.

     

    Romans 15: 4-13: Here St. Paul quotes Isaiah's words; proclaiming them fulfilled in Jesus Christ. God has remained faithful to the Jewish nation; and has opened up the way of salvation to Gentiles as well. We can therefore live in hope and joy and peace. We can also hold the welcome door open to all others. Everyone is wanted in God's kingdom.

     

    Matthew 3:1-12: A prophet of the Lord has not spoken for 400 years. Suddenly John the Baptizer steps on the stage. No wonder the people flocked from the cities out into the wilderness to hear him. He comes with a message of repentance, and is especially hard on the religious leaders. He baptizes with water, but he points the way to one who will come baptizing with the power of the Holy Spirit.

     

     

     

    Scripture Summary for the 3rd Sunday of Advent – Year A (Dec 11) by Rev. Shelley

     

    Isaiah 35: 1-10: The prophet Isaiah paints a beautiful picture of what lies ahead in God's future. All of nature will live in harmony. The desert land will bloom with flowers. The thirsty land will teem with water. Wild beasts will be tame. The blind will see and the deaf will hear. No one will go astray, not even fools. So what can we do? Strengthen weak hands and encourage ones with fearful hearts. For the Lord will fill all with joy and gladness, and sorrow and sighing will be put to flight.

     

    Canticle 18 A (Luke 1:46-55): To replace our Psalm this morning we have a reading from the Gospel of Luke. Mary sings this song after she has been given the message that she will bear the Messiah. She cannot believe that this great event is happening to one who is poor and and of no repute. She sees now that God delights in doing what the world cannot imagine. The hungry are the ones being filled. The lowly are the ones being lifted up. It is the rich and powerful who are being sent away empty. This echoes what God has already done for tiny Israel; producing through them Father Abraham – the father of all those who have faith. Jesus will now open the way to God for the entire world.

     

    James 5:7-10: Again we are given encouragement to wait patiently and to endure. The picture of an attentive farmer shows us the way. The farmer must still plant, water, and mulch. There is work to be done; even if no plants are immediately visible. We too know the final outcome; God's kingdom of love will prevail. So we need to wait patiently; all the while preparing for God's harvest, as a farmer prepares for the coming crop. .

     

    Matthew 11:2-11: John the Baptist's message is just too hard for the ruling authorities to accept. So he is now in prison awaiting his fate. Here he begins to doubt. Is Jesus really the Messiah? Did I get it wrong? John's followers bring him back Jesus' reassuring response. “The words of Isaiah are about to be fulfilled in me”. Don't doubt. Jesus then gives John a beautiful affirming commendation that he is the greatest prophet that the world has seen. And in the final reversal – even the lowest in God's new kingdom will be greater than John, for they will know the full revelation of God revealed in Jesus Christ.

     

     

     

    Scripture Summary for 4th Sunday of Advent – Year A (Dec 18) by Rev. Shelley

     

    Isaiah 7:10-16: The prophet Isaiah comes to King Ahaz. “Ask the Lord for the most amazing sign that you can think of – anything”. But the king hesitates. So God provides a sign. A young woman will bear a child. This baby will bring hope, and his mother will name him Immanuel, meaning “God is with us”. This sign is not only for Ahaz's time, but is seen as a prophecy for the coming of Jesus Christ.

     

    Psalm 80:1-7, 17-19: The Psalmist calls on God to restore the fortunes of his people. He reminds God that He is their shepherd. He reminds God that the flock is in peril. “Restore us, O God; let your face shine, that we may be saved”. When this happens, the people will never forsake the Living God again.

     

    Romans 1:1-7: In this introduction to his most dense and theological letter, the Apostle Paul outlines his calling to ministry. He also summarizes the good news that he has been called to preach. The story has been outlined by the prophets. Jesus has come as a descendent of King David and has been declared the Son of God by his innocent death and glorious resurrection. This is good news for both Jews and Gentiles.

     

    Matthew 1:18-25: Today we hear Joseph's version of the Nativity story. It starts with disappointment – his fiancee is already pregnant. He wants to break the engagement quietly. However, God uses a powerful dream to give Joseph a different story line. This is not going to be an ordinary baby, and Mary has not been unfaithful to him. This is the long awaited “Emmanuel” - the one who will save his people from their sins. Joseph listened to his dream and obeyed by marrying Mary, and naming the baby “Jesus”.

     

     

     

    Scripture Summary for Christmas Eve – Year A by Rev. Shelley

     

    Isaiah 9:2-7: Isaiah poetically prophesies of a time when God will visit the people. Light instead of darkness. Rejoicing rather than repression. Army fatigues now used for kindling a fire. This will be brought about by a child. Wonderful Counselor. Mighty God. Everlasting Father. Prince of Peace. He will have special titles and will rule with righteousness and justice. (This passage was written approximately 600 years before the birth of Jesus).

     

    Psalm 96: The Psalmist invites us to sing to the Lord. All other gods are idols, but the Lord God made the cosmos. His judgement of all peoples will be fair and just. Therefore all the world can rejoice.

     

    Titus 2:11-14: St. Paul encourages us to live a worthy live as we wait for God to appear. We are to rely on his grace to show us how to live lives filled with righteousness and good deeds. How can we do this? By relying on God's grace, which brings salvation to all.

     

    Luke 2:1-20: Mary and Joseph. Angels and shepherds. The Roman emperor demanding obedience. We all know the story of Jesus' birth. The harder task is to see how the angel's message can become good news to us and how it can bring us great joy.

     

     

     

    Scripture Summary for Christmas - Year A by Rev. Shelley

     

    Isaiah 52:7-10: “Your God reigns”. What better way to start Christmas morning. If we have this song on our lips then we are called beautiful. This is a message of salvation to all. The city that has been ruined will be restored. God brings comfort to those in distress. God is the mighty one, bringing good news to all the earth.

     

    Psalm 98: The Psalmist invites us to sing to the Lord. Why? Because to this God belongs victory – over all those things that oppress: sin, unrighteousness, fear, and evil. And this is done in the sight of all the nations. Therefore we, and all creation can sing for joy and clap our hands.

     

    Hebrews 1:1-4, (5-12): Until that 1st Christmas day, God spoke through prophets (many of them recorded in our Bible). But now – all life will be looked at and lived through God’s Son Jesus Christ. This is the moment, and this is the One that the prophets have been pointing to and waiting for. Jesus will be the word “made flesh”. Through his sinless life of service and teaching, and his sacrificial death, Jesus will show us the heart of God.

     

    John 1:1-14: John does not follow Matthew and Luke in starting Jesus’ origin stories with infancy narratives. Instead he goes even further back in time to the creation of the cosmos. The Christ child, now so little and helpless, has chosen this new role. He was from “of old” but he wants to identify fully with all we go through in this vale of tears. The desire: to bring light to the world to enable us to see the glory of God in the flesh.